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Tools and Insights in the Fight Against Hate

Our Resources

Hate Incidents Map

We track hate incidents, including crimes that involve bias and discrimination against identity groups. Explore the map below to see activity in your area and around the nation.

Are you a member of an identity-based community group and would like access to our resources and programs to take action against hate?

If you or someone you know has been the target of hate, don’t be silent—take action! Report it to our Sayfer team so that we can investigate, track it and help stop the perpetrators.

Frequently Asked Questions

Common questions about combating hate and hate crime

Lexicon of Terms

The Center for Freedom and Safety (CFS) was founded to fight and educate about extremism and hate in America by researching and documenting hate groups, individuals, organizations, campaigns, and events associated with these hate groups.

To pursue our mission in a legal and ethical manner, clear definitions of specified terms, including hate crimes, are required to ensure there is clear guidance to govern the conduct of our activities. The below definitions are based on applicable policies provided by the U.S. Department of Justice and additional sources.

What is "Hate"?

Hate is bias against people or groups with specific characteristics that are defined by law.

The specific categories are:

  • Race, color, ethnicity
  • National origin
  • Religion
  • Gender, gender identity
  • Sexual orientation
  • Disability
  • Association with person or group (actual or perceived) covered by the above categories

What is "Hate Speech"?

In the United States, there is no legal definition of “hate speech.” The term is understood as any form of expression or communication—including spoken, written, or visual—that attacks or discriminates against a particular individual or group based on their identity traits such as race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender, or any other characteristic that is protected under the law.

Hate speech is often used to spread harmful stereotypes, promote prejudice and discrimination, and incite violence or hostility towards certain individuals or groups. It can have a serious impact on the psychological well-being of its targets and can contribute to a broader climate of intolerance and discrimination.

While most speech is protected under the First Amendment to the Constitution, hate speech can become a crime when it directly incites criminal activity or uses specific threats of violence targeted against a person or group. 

What is a "Hate Crime"?

Crime against a person, group, or property motivated by the victim’s real or perceived protected group. Hate crimes are often violent in nature, although this is not a required condition, and are actions that may result in imprisonment or jail time.

Examples include:

  • Murder
  • Assault
  • Arson
  • Vandalism
  • Threats to commit the above
  • Conspiring or asking others to commit the above (even if crime never carried out)

What is a "Hate Incident"?

An action or behavior motivated by hate against a protected group, but not considered a crime as the action itself is constitutionally protected, as in the case of free speech. While not technically crimes, they can often have an affect on the targeted demographic.

Examples of hate incidents include:

  • Name calling, slurs and insults
  • Displays of hate material on personal property
  • Posting hate materials that do not result in property damage
  • Distribution of hate materials in public places

Hate Crime Statistics

The FBI’s Officially Reported 2022 Hate Crime Statistics

In 2022, hate crime incidents rose over 7.4% from 2021.*

 

 

Victims of Hate Crime Incidents

  • 11,636 hate crime incidents involved 13,711 victims
  • 11,288 of these incidents were based on a single bias.
  • 346 hate crimes affecting 433 victims were targeted because of more than one bias
  • 6,567- Race / Ethnicity / Ancestry 59.1% 59.1%
  • 1,944 – Sexual Orientation 17.2% 17.2%
  • 2,042 – Religion 17.3% 17.3%
  • 469 – Gender Identity 4.0% 4.0%
  • 171 – Disability 1.5% 1.5%
  • 95 – Gender 0.9% 0.9%

Offenses by Crime Category

Known Offenders by Race

%

8,842 crimes against persons

%

4,254 crimes against property

%

334 crimes against society

%

White

%

Black or African American

%

Other races

Offenses by Crime Category

%

8,237 crimes against persons

%

3,817 crimes against property

%

267 crimes against society

Known Offenders by Race

%

White

%

Black or African American

%

Other races

As alarming as this data is, the reality is that it is far from complete. In addition to a large number of hate crimes going unreported, as of 2022, several law enforcement agencies, as well as some states, are not included in the 2022 reported totals.

*4,290 (22.7%) of the 18,921 nation’s law enforcement agencies did not submit their hate crime statistics.

Let’s Change the Statistics &
Regain Our Freedom and Safety

Join with CFS and our partners to improve the reporting of and response to hate incidents.